1993 Jimmy Dean

1993 Jimmy Dean Daulton Front 1993 Jimmy Dean Daulton Back

Card dimensions: 2½” x 3½”
Manufacturer: Michael Schecter Associates
Additional Information/14,000 Phillies Commentary: Inserted in packages of Jimmy Dean sausage products. Looking back, it’s amazing just how long Michael Schecter Associates (MSA) produced MLBPA-only licensed cards for various regional and national companies and retail chains. MSA started doing this in the mid ’70s and continued to do so for nearly 20 years. I would say that the quality of their product improved over time, but it’s hard to completely support such a statement when you look at the line drawing on the back of the card — very reminiscent of the line art on the 1986 Keller’s Butter Phillies set.

Airbrushed photos such as the one on Daulton’s card are how I envision what most of Upper Deck’s cards will look like now that they have an MLBPA license. I just don’t see them posing players in plain, white jerseys the way Panini does for its MLBPA-approved sets.

5 Darren Daulton
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2 responses to “1993 Jimmy Dean

  1. If you;re collecting Phillies cards, I guess you have to get them, but I just don’t like MSA cards.

    Speaking of cards without logos, there are a bunch of Pete Rose cards from the 2012 Pete Rose set that you can add to your collection, if you don’t have them already. At $15 a box with one autographed card per box, it’s hard to find a cheaper Pete Rose autograph as well.

    • I know I’m splitting hairs here, but I collected the MSA cards because they (at least, most of them), actually used the word “Phillies” on the card — even if the logos were airbrushed out. It’s a small difference, but it makes them feel slightly more like real Phillies cards. For the most part, I’m still staying away from the newer product that comes without MLB approval. There have been notable exceptions — Tyler Cloyd’s and Darin Ruf’s autographed Elite cards, for instance — but it’s a lot easier to ignore the product when there is so much of it. This wasn’t the case with the MSA sets — in any given year there were fewer than 10 Phillies in all the MSA sets combined.

      I’m almost certainly staying away from the new Pete Rose set. I already picked up a 2008 Donruss Sports Legends Pete Rose autograph, so there’s little in it that could entice me. The only MLBPA-only licensed set in the last few years for which I gave any thought to assembling a Phillies team set was 2012 Panini Cooperstown, and even then I decided against it rather quickly.

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